If you want the gravy…

…You've got to get the biscuits!


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My Six-Month Film Awards: 2017

2017 Six Month Best Picture

Time flies when you’re having fun, and even if I haven’t been having as much fun as I’d hoped – I’ve only seen 19 films for this year so far, compared with 35 this time last year – it’s still hard to believe it’s already time for this year’s Six-Month Awards.

Because I’ve seen so few films, I considered not doing them, but was persuaded to otherwise; partially for consistency’s sake (thank you, Maggie!), and partially because I love doing these posts. So let’s see what we’ve got!

Picture:

  1. A Quiet Passion
  2. Kedi
  3. Wonder Woman
  4. Baby Driver
  5. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

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My 6th Annual Film Awards: Your Winners

IMG_1886.CR2

Striding right along to that win.

I may not do this again.

In 2014, the fewest votes any category got was 77. In 2015, it was 45. This year, no category got more than 17 votes.

I don’t know why. I did my damnedest to get the word out. I used Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and even Instagram to try and draw voters. And none of it seemed to take. Were the nominees uninspiring? Was I too pushy? Did you just not want to be reminded of 2016?

If you’re inclined to answer, please give me your thoughts in the comments. I’d really love to hear them. And I do want to say how much I appreciate those of you who did vote. I only wish there were more of you.

The nominees are listed here; my winners, here. And now, your winners.

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My 6th Annual Film Awards: The Nominations

best-picture-2016

Best Picture:

  • Christine
  • Don’t Think Twice
  • Elle
  • Fences
  • The Handmaiden
  • Indignation
  • Jackie
  • The Lobster
  • Nocturnal Animals
  • Weiner

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My Six-Month Film Awards: 2016

The Lobster poster

“Why a lobster?” “Because lobsters live for over 100 years, are blue-blooded like aristocrats, and they stay fertile all of their lives.”

Picture:

  1. The Lobster
  2. Weiner
  3. Finding Dory
  4. Captain America: Civil War
  5. Zootopia
  6. Swiss Army Man
  7. Tale of Tales
  8. The Invitation
  9. Lamb
  10. Elvis & Nixon

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INHERENT VICE Review – ****

"It's not what you think, Doc." "Don't worry, thinking comes later."

“It’s not what you think, Doc.”
“Don’t worry, thinking comes later.”

This could be one of the easiest or one of the most difficult reviews I’ve yet written. Inherent Vice is the kind of film which cares less about making sense than you might think, a film which plunges into a world where the 60s are curdling into the 70s, where free love isn’t so free, where the dope so casually consumed by our protagonists is, literally and symbolically, tainted, and where peace, love, and understanding slowly crumble in the face of greed and conspiracy.

It’s a noir where so much of the central mystery remains unresolved at the end that you’re not sure whether the answers aren’t in plain sight, hidden behind the mumbles of our so-often-stoned hero, or whether the mystery is mostly the result of his “hippie paranoia”, so avidly mocked by his opposite number in the LAPD. It’s a mess and it knows it. A single viewing is probably totally insufficient to grasp it–which presumes it could ever be grasped.

But–you’ve no doubt noticed the “****?” above–this is a P.T. Anderson film. One of our best working filmmakers, making the first-ever adaptation of a Thomas Pynchon novel (where it once seemed that Pynchon would never allow it), with a top-notch cast and crew. A major event indeed. And as confused as I was, particularly at the end, I laughed so much, and was so pleased with the lovely cinematography, with Anderson’s craftsmanship as director and adapter, and with the performances, that I doubted not but that this was some kind of a great film.

These are not my final thoughts on the film. Hopefully before too long I will see it again and will append my additional thoughts to the end of this review. But you can only see a film for the first time once, and a film like this…doubly so.

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